Press Releases and Media Coverage

Victor Chirilas, Director Mainmark UK, addresses the importance of efficiency in meeting the housing demand in England

In 2015 the Government set out with the ambition to deliver one million ‘net additions’ to the housing stock by 2020, which included conversions and changes of use, giving property developers two clear options: building more housing or renovating/converting existing buildings.

Victor Chirilas, Director Mainmark UK, addresses the importance of efficiency in meeting the housing demand in England

In 2015 the Government set out with the ambition to deliver one million ‘net additions’ to the housing stock by 2020, which included conversions and changes of use, giving property developers two clear options: building more housing or renovating/converting existing buildings.

Victor Chirilas, Director of Mainmark Ground Engineering, UK discusses subsidence in heritage buildings and when to seek professional help.

Mainmark, a ground engineering specialist company based in Milton Keynes, is opening a new operational hub in Hampshire, to support a growing portfolio of clients in the South of England. The Australian-owned company established its UK head office six years ago and has completed over 500 projects since then.

Caring for the long-term health of any heritage building brings unique challenges.

Buildings that have stood for hundreds of years, have their own cultural and historical significance and, whatever their purpose – a school, a church or a stately home – they have a special place in the communities in which they still stand. However, the methods and the materials used in their original construction, don’t always stand the test of time and issues of subsidence are one of the most common problems.

The construction industry is known for its heavy use of natural resources, which is often an unavoidable part of the process. However, as the UK Government becomes more conscious of climate change and its impact on the world there is an increasing drive to re-think the way we build and re-design the built environment.

The construction industry is known for its heavy use of natural resources, which is often an unavoidable part of the process. However, as the UK Government becomes more conscious of climate change and its impact on the world there is an increasing drive to re-think the way we build and re-design the built environment.

The construction industry is known for its heavy use of natural resources, which is often an unavoidable part of the process. However, as the UK Government becomes more conscious of climate change and its impact on the world there is an increasing drive to re-think the way we build and re-design the built environment.

With thousands of homes affected every year, subsidence can reduce your property’s resale value by as much as 20%. Here’s how to spot it and stop it in its tracks…

The UK’s road and infrastructure network is in constant need of upkeep and traditional remediation methods are often too slow to keep our networks running in a timely, cost-efficient manner. This ultimately leads to much public frustration and loss of confidence in our government’s ability to, quite literally, take us where we want to go.

The UK’s road and infrastructure network is in constant need of upkeep and traditional remediation methods are often too slow to keep our networks running in a timely, cost-efficient manner.

Subsidence compromises the integrity of a building. While concrete underpinning and ground improvement can help to slow or stop a building from subsiding further, sometimes this is not enough. In warehouse and manufacturing environments for example, it is crucial that a building is level and stable to ensure the safety of the facility. Therefore, raising and re-levelling a building can be a necessity.